All tagged Charleston

BREATHE: Black Womxn’s Radical Peace as Afrofuturism in Praxis

Since completing this graduate work, I have continued considering Afrofuturism as a liberatory tool -- a form of technology we can access and engage at anytime. Furthermore, I believe research of and attention to the voices of Africana and Indigenous peoples, and more specifically, the survival and resilience of queer Black and Brown people, illustrates Afrofuturism being employed as a path forward throughout human history.

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Cheveze Daniel

I’m an all-natural hair stylist. I service all African textured hair & hairstyles–no chemicals or heat. I’m ultimately a visual artist. I draw/paint original artwork on canvas. I mostly use acrylic paint but I’m slowly going back into graphite. I’ve learned that I shade better using graphite mediums. I take photos; I’m a canon shooter. I’m also a wire wrapping jewelry-maker. I create unique pieces using brass, crystals and seashells from Folly Beach and Isle of Palms. I started wire wrapping once I began learning more about the city of Charleston and how sacred this land is to the melanated people. It shocked me that I’m from only two hours up the interstate, yet was never exposed to all of the history here. I started making the jewelry because I wanted to acknowledge all that I’d learned and share that acknowledgement with others. I create this jewelry to honor all of my ancestors across the shores of South Carolina. I added crystals once I became aware that all minerals have their own beneficial properties.

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Deronda C. Washington

My passion continues to lie with women and children. I love empowering them to be the best THEM they can be. Because my husband and I recently experienced fertility issues, I want to be a voice for African American women dealing with infertility. There are few resources available to help African American women get through this–especially with the culture we are in.

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Kyndra Joi

Once you understand the history of our Gullah Geechee ancestors, their intuition, their genius to adapt, cultivate and thrive, a sense of pride swells within you. To have an identity, language and culture so unique and so similar to our Afrikan brothers and sisters, it just fills my spirit. When I went to Senegal, Ghana and Cote de voire and ate the same meals that my famlee eats on a daily basis, it just blew my mind. I am a direct descendant of the coast of West Afrika. I am a Gullah Warrior Woman. I am proud to speak my language, tell our story and pass on traditions so our ancestors nor our Gullah Geechee culture will never be forgotten. I am because They are!

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Grace T. Walker-Harrison

I’ve been exposed to so many things in just a short period of time, it’s hard to narrow my passions down to one or two. So far I absolutely love African Dance and everything that comes under that umbrella. My body automatically responds to the music without a thought. I’m passionate about Gullah Geechee culture. Learning my history is amazing and it constantly leaves me in awe.

I am a mother of two active teenage girls, a wife, a full-time employee, an African dancer,business owner, and I assist with Gullah Geechee Angel Network events. Organization and balance is key for me. There are times when I may take a day or weekend to do absolutely nothing.

CAB: Resources for "Our Existence is Resistance"

Below is the Cumulative Annotated Bibliography I created during my first term in graduate school. After presenting at the 7th Annual Archeological Conference of the South Carolina Lowcountry, a few people came up and asked about my research. I'm committed to sharing everything I've learned and making resources as accessible is possible. Whether reading for work, school, or pleasure, I will continuously update my reading list with literature that is expanding my outlook. I hope it is as helpful to you!