All in Scholarship

The Ones We've Been Waiting For: Gullah Geechee Womxn, Epigenetics, and Time-Travel

Afrofuturism seemed capable of honoring not only our brokenness, but also a reality in which we are healed. I was pleasantly surprised to find how closely Afrofuturism and womanism align as paths to liberation and safety for Black womxn and femmes. Both ideologies are deeply rooted in Africana tradition and our affinity to speak ourselves whole.

Another unexpected revelation was the connection between Gullah Geechee culture and Afrofuturism. 

Legacies of Resistance: A Literature Review

Freed women understood that their value had previously rested on their ability to reproduce, and the outwardly assigned identity as wanton, subhuman workers, always available for the sexual desires of others. Emancipation brought new labels and terminology to the landscape, but the racial dynamics that positioned Black women on the bottom tier remained, morphed, intensified. Common themes persisted throughout the transition to freedom and despite a concerted effort to keep black women fearful and compliant.

Our Existence is Resistance

With this paper, I wish to recognize womanist application in the lives of historic Africana women. More specifically, I’ve searched for and analyzed examples of womanism in Gullah Geechee women in the South. I’ve lived in Gullah Geechee communities for most of my life. From Beaufort, to Charleston, to Pawley’s Island and Georgetown, SC, I became a woman in Southern communities that astound and attract tourists with their natural beauty, Southern charm, and manufactured nostalgia.  Beneath the shiny, gentile façade lies a web of oppression—centuries old. It is with this understanding, that I describe the motivation for this study.