All in Narratives

The Ones We've Been Waiting For: Gullah Geechee Womxn, Epigenetics, and Time-Travel

Afrofuturism seemed capable of honoring not only our brokenness, but also a reality in which we are healed. I was pleasantly surprised to find how closely Afrofuturism and womanism align as paths to liberation and safety for Black womxn and femmes. Both ideologies are deeply rooted in Africana tradition and our affinity to speak ourselves whole.

Another unexpected revelation was the connection between Gullah Geechee culture and Afrofuturism. 

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Shaniqua Davenport Coaxum

I am a licensed cosmetologist and owner of Naturelle Beaute’ by Shaniqua in Charlotte, NC. I believe that I’ve been called to counsel and educate, and I do this whenever I stand behind my chair. I am also a wife and an expectant mother!

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Kyndra Joi

Once you understand the history of our Gullah Geechee ancestors, their intuition, their genius to adapt, cultivate and thrive, a sense of pride swells within you. To have an identity, language and culture so unique and so similar to our Afrikan brothers and sisters, it just fills my spirit. When I went to Senegal, Ghana and Cote de voire and ate the same meals that my famlee eats on a daily basis, it just blew my mind. I am a direct descendant of the coast of West Afrika. I am a Gullah Warrior Woman. I am proud to speak my language, tell our story and pass on traditions so our ancestors nor our Gullah Geechee culture will never be forgotten. I am because They are!

Geechee Gals Gettin' It - Vol. 1: Khetnu Nefer

Being Gullah Geechee to me means being proud to be a descendant of a treasured heritage that encompasses more than the middle passage. Our Gullah Geechee ancestors set the precedence and survived despite the odds. Being Gullah Geechee means being the benefactor of a rich and unique living culture that needs to be recognized for its numerous contributions. I call myself the Geechee Goddess in honor of the wonderful strong and intelligent Gullah Geechee women who came before me and shaped and molded my existence.

Personal Reflections and Issa Rae’s “Insecure” from a Forever Awkward, Formerly Insecure Black Girl

It is only fitting that I viewed Insecure, Issa’s bomb ass, sweat and tear filled, hard fought for, well-damn-deserved HBO Glo Up as this New Sara I am now. I like this Sara the most. So bear with me: these reflections are coming after watching all of season 1 twice. Once by myself, and a second time with my boyfriend. I was a bit surprised to read the reviews and responses shared on my various social media timelines. I see a lot of #TeamIssa or #TeamLawrence. A lot of familiar hurts and bruised egos and triggers.** Throughout the season I remained on #TeamDamnWeReallyAreBrokenAF, #TeamWeAllNeedHelp and #TeamHealing.

Our Existence is Resistance

With this paper, I wish to recognize womanist application in the lives of historic Africana women. More specifically, I’ve searched for and analyzed examples of womanism in Gullah Geechee women in the South. I’ve lived in Gullah Geechee communities for most of my life. From Beaufort, to Charleston, to Pawley’s Island and Georgetown, SC, I became a woman in Southern communities that astound and attract tourists with their natural beauty, Southern charm, and manufactured nostalgia.  Beneath the shiny, gentile façade lies a web of oppression—centuries old. It is with this understanding, that I describe the motivation for this study.